Laptop Memory Upgrades Guide - Part 3

Types of laptop memory modules

types of laptop computer memory modules

In this section we'll discuss what you need to know about laptop memory modules. You'll find it useful for several reasons, first of all you'll discover the different types of RAM modules available, one of which your laptop will use. Secondly we'll look at the theory behind installing these modules - this will be useful when we later come round to installing them in part 6 of the Laptop Memory Upgrades Guide. Thirdly, we'll spend some moments discussing memory slots and how they relate to the various types of RAM modules. Last but not least we'll look at the topic of dual channel operation and explain what this means to you and your laptop. Let's make a start.


Types of laptop RAM modules - laying down the theory

72pin SIMM (Single In-line Memory Module)

A 72pin SIMM RAM module is the oldest type of memory module you'll likely find used in laptops. If you are fortunate to have such a laptop in your posession then it's best described as a part of vintage computing. The early 1990's resulted in SIMM's dissapearing from laptops and several years later equally from desktops. A 72pin SIMM laptop RAM module is 32bit wide. Depending on the width of the processor's system bus (32 or 64bits) this meant that 72pin SIMM's had to be installed in up to pairs to create a combined 64bit wide interface. Both FPM and EDO RAM comes on 72pin SIMM's in the form of two different voltages, 5V (usually FPM) and 3.3V (usually EDO). It's easy to tell apart a 72pin SIMM from newer types of laptop RAM modules because they're longer than SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM modules


72pin SIMM
72pin SIMM featuring FPM or EDO memory

72, 144, 200, 204pin SODIMM (Small Outline Dual In-line Memory Module)

Along with the dismiss of SIMM's, 72pin SODIMM's and newer started appearing. The latter started gainining sheer popularity in laptops at around about 1996-1997 and at that time featured EDO RAM or SDRAM. The trend, albeit with SODIMM's with a higher number of pins has continued till this very day. All modern SODIMM's are 64bit wide meaning that even in recent laptops, only one SODIMM RAM module needs to be installed for a laptop to operate (though often this isn't the optimum configuration). Pairs of newer 200 and 204pin DDR, DDR2 or DDR3 SODIMM's are installed in laptops that support dual channel operation. SODIMM's run at different voltages depending on their type, which conicides with the memory technology they feature. For example, 72pin EDO memory SODIMM's run at 3.3V as do 144pin SDRAM SODIMM's. Newer 200pin DDR and DDR2 SODIMM's run at 2.5-1.8V while 204pin DDR3 SODIMM's run at only 1.5V. It's easy to tell apart a 72, 144, 200, 204pin SODIMM from other types of laptop RAM modules because they're smaller than SIMM's but larger than MicroDIMM's.


72pin SODIMM
72pin SODIMM featuring FPM or EDO memory
144pin SODIMM
144pin SODIMM featuring SDRAM memory
200pin SODIMM
200pin SODIMM featuring DDR or DDR2 memory
204pin SODIMM
204pin SODIMM featuring DDR3 memory

144, 172, 214pin MicroDIMM (Micro Dual In-line Memory Module)

A MicroDIMM is the smallest widely comercially used laptop RAM module type and is featured in an array of small sub-laptops (more commonly known as sub-notebooks) and select netbooks. They are a miniture form of traditional SODIMM's, which as you would have learned from the above are larger. MicroDIMM's can be found in a series of SDRAM, DDR and DDR2 memory based laptops where space is tight. MicroDIMM's are 64bit wide hence even in recent laptops only one MicroDIMM laptop RAM module needs to be installed for the laptop to operate. Where supported, pairs of 172 and 214pin DDR and DDR2 MicroDIMM's can be installed in laptops to run in dual channel mode. MicroDIMM's run at the same voltages as equivilant SODIMM's, for example a 144pin SDRAM MicroDIMM runs at 3.3V, a 172pin DDR MicroDIMM runs at 2.5V while a 214pin DDR2 MicroDIMM runs at 1.8V. It is easy to tell apart a 144, 172, 214pin MicroDIMM from other types of laptop RAM modules because they're much smaller than SIMM's and smaller than SODIMM's.


144pin MICRODIMM
144pin MicroDIMM featuring SDRAM memory
172pin MICRODIMM
172pin MicroDIMM featuring DDR memory
214pin MICRODIMM
214pin MicroDIMM featuring DDR2 memory

Single and Double-sided laptop RAM modules

Modern laptops usually have no problems when mixing single and double-sided RAM modules. Nonetheless, it's still good practise to stick to either and not both when performing a laptop memory upgrade.


Single-sided and double-sided is the name given to laptop RAM modules which feature memory chips soldered onto either one or both sides. This visual difference is however not the only facet as both are wired (internally connected) somewhat differently and it's this aspect that at times may result in problematic behaviour in some laptops. Technically speaking, the single and double-sided characteristic of laptop RAM concerns whether the memory chips soldered onto the RAM module are connected in one or two ranks. Think of a rank as a collection of memory chips of the same group.


Select laptops, especially those that are older (made up to 2000) do not work favourably when both single and double-sided laptop RAM modules are installed at the same time. The memory controller found within these affected laptops cannot ensure stable operation when both types are present. For this reason, it's good practise to not mix single and double-sided RAM modules when upgrading. High capacity RAM modules of a given memory technology are double-sided while those that are low capacity are usually single-sided. If you have an older laptop then by remembering this you'll already be half way to avoiding potential problems.


The other aspect you need to know is how to tell apart a high capacity and low capacity laptop RAM module. This can be achieved in two ways, one that is harder and one that's easier. The harder way involves knowing what constitutes a high capacity module featuring for example EDO, SDRAM or perhaps DDR2 RAM (simply put, a given memory technology). This method takes knowledge and experience thus is best used only by experienced users.


The easier way is to look at the description of a laptop RAM module. In such description you'll usually see the number 64 along with another number. This other number (with the "x" in between) is the capacity of memory chips used to make up the laptop RAM module. For example, a 8x64 would mean the RAM module comprises 8MB memory chips. If you take the total capacity of the RAM module (for example 64MB) and divide this by the number of 8MB, you'll arrive at the figure of 8. In this examples this means the laptop RAM module uses 8 memory chips. As this is most probably a type of SODIMM (since 64MB SIMM's are very rare, especially in laptops), it will be double-sided because 4 memory chips will be soldered on one side, and 4 on the other. In fact, the vast majority of laptop RAM modules feature a maximum of 4 memory chips per one side. The only exception are 72pin SIMM's that feature up to 8 memory chips per a side. MicroDIMM's as a much rarer form of laptop computer memory feature up to 2 chips per a side.


Some less known brand names of laptop RAM do unfortunately ocassionally break the above rule by installing high density memory chips on both sides of a RAM module but still connecting them as one rank. For this reason don't try and hunt down the absolute best bargain when buying laptop RAM. Instead, stick to brand names that have a reputation to live up to. We'll be showing you how to safely and successfully buy laptop RAM in part 5 of the Laptop Memory Upgrades Guide.



Mixing laptop RAM modules from different manufactures

There is no strict special care necessary when mixing RAM from two or more different manufactuers, providing of course it's of the same specification and above all suited for your laptop. If the new laptop RAM module is of a different make than the current one then in the vast majority of cases this will not pose a problem. In some rare cases select laptops may have compatability issues when mixing RAM modules from various manufactuers but such occurence is much more rare today than in older laptops. For this reason, while there is usually no problem in mixing different brands of laptop RAM modules together, it's still best practise to avoid this if possible.



Laptop RAM modules and backward compatibility

Since SDRAM, laptop RAM modules have been backward compatible. What this means is that a higher specification RAM module of the same memory technology but higher memory frequency can operate in a laptop that only requires the lower specification equivilant. For example, PC133 (thus 133MHz) SDRAM 144pin SODIMM RAM modules will work in a laptop which only requires PC100 (thus 100MHz) SDRAM 144pin SODIMM RAM modules - in such case they would run at 100MHz instead of the rated 133MHz. In a similar way, if a laptop already has the PC100 SDRAM variety installed and an additional SODIMM of the PC133 variety was to be installed in the vacant memory slot, such practice would also permit the laptop to run successfully. In both examples the frequency at which the RAM would run at is 100MHz, this is because it's the fastest frequency (standard) supported by both RAM modules.


The above statement is of course also true for newer DDR2 and DDR3 RAM since the latter are both newer memory technologies than SDRAM. The reasoning behind why this has become the norm is that JEDEC, the institution that develops memory standards as we explained in part 2 of the Laptop Memory Upgrades Guide designs future memory standards of the same memory technology (family) by incorporating compatability with such previous memory standards. While this does offer you some flexibility when upgrading, we would still recommend you upgrade using the fastest RAM modules supported by your laptop. The reasonining behind why is equally simple - only the fastest memory modules can unlock the best performance in terms of memory throughput.


Installing different types of laptop RAM modules - turning theory into practice

Upgrading a single channel laptop - applies to FPM, EDO, SDRAM and in some cases DDR based laptops

All laptops up to and including many that use DDR memory only support single channel operation. Because of this there is no associated benefit in installing one or more RAM module(s) (in the case of newer SODIMM SDRAM, DDR or older SODIMM FPM, EDO laptops) or two or more RAM modules (in the case of older original Pentium class SIMM FPM or EDO laptops). The latter also applies to even older laptops (pre-Pentium class) which exclusively relied on SIMM modules - these often require installing memory it sets of four RAM modules. In all these mentioned scenarios there will be not be an additional boost in memory throughput. The only benefit will be the higher total amount of installed RAM. Follow the below practises when upgrading your single channel laptop.



  • 1a) Single-channel laptops that use SIMM RAM modules (my laptop has unoccupied memory slots)
  • If your Pentium class laptop supporting FPM or EDO RAM in the form of a SIMM RAM module has some unoccupied memory slots (for example out of a total of four, two are vacant) then all you really need to do is purchase two likewise identical FPM or EDO 72pin SIMM RAM modules to occupy the unoccupied two memory slots. The only exception to this statement is if you wish to upgrade such older laptop to the maximum amount of RAM it supports. In such case you would need to install the highest capacity 72pin SIMM RAM modules supported by your laptop, one in each memory slot. Consequently, this may involve removing the existing 72pin SIMM RAM modules.


    Valid laptop memory upgrades (examples) are 2x16MB EDO 72pin SIMM, 2x32MB EDO 72pin SIMM, 4x16MB FPM SIMM etc. The maximum capacity of RAM module will vary depending on your model of laptop (specifically its memory controller). Not all older laptops support EDO RAM, in such case you must use FPM RAM. Keep in mind that you cannot mix FPM and EDO RAM together, for example a pair of 72pin SIMM RAM modules consiting of 2x16MB EDO is valid however the same is not true for a pair of 72pin SIMM RAM modules consiting of 1x 16MB EDO and 1x 16MB FPM.


  • 1b) Single-channel laptops that use SIMM RAM modules (my laptop has no unoccupied memory slots)
  • If your Pentium class laptop supporting FPM or EDO RAM in the form of a SIMM RAM module does not have any unoccupied memory slots then there is no choice but to first remove at least one pair of 72pin SIMM FPM or EDO RAM modules from the corresponding memory slots. Providing that the currently installed combined total of memory is below the maximum supported capacity by your laptop then either one or both (in the case of laptops that feature a total of four memory slots) of the currently installed pairs of laptop RAM can be exchanged for larger capacity 72pin FPM or EDO RAM modules. To achieve this, purchase two or four likewise higher capacity identical FPM or EDO 72pin SIMM RAM modules to occupy the two or four memory slots. Keep in mind that if you wish to upgrade such an older laptop to the maximum amount of supported RAM then you must install the highest capacity of 72pin SIMM RAM module supported by your laptop, one in each memory slot.


    Valid laptop memory upgrades (examples) are the same as in (1a) above.


  • 2a) Single-channel laptops that use SODIMM RAM modules (my laptop has unoccupied memory slots)
  • If your Pentium or newer class laptop supporting FPM, EDO, SDRAM or DDR RAM in the form of a SODIMM RAM module has some unoccupied memory slots (for example out of a total of two, one is vacant) then all you really need to do is purchase a likewise FPM, EDO, SDRAM or DDR 72, 144, 200pin SODIMM RAM module to occupy the unoccupied memory slot. The only exception to this statement is if you wish to upgrade such older laptop to the maximum amount of RAM it supports. In such case you would need to install the highest capacity of 72, 144, 200pin SODIMM RAM module your laptop supports, one in each memory slot. Consequently, this may involve removing the existing 72, 144, 200pin SODIMM RAM module.


    Valid laptop memory upgrades (examples) are 1x16MB FPM 72pin SODIMM, 1x32MB EDO 72pin SODIMM, 1x64MB SDRAM 144pin SODIMM, 1x256MB DDR 200pin SODIMM etc. The maximum capacity of laptop RAM module will vary depending on your model of laptop (specifically its memory controller). Not all older laptops support EDO RAM, in such case you must use FPM RAM. More modern laptops support either SDRAM or DDR RAM. Keep in mind you cannot mix FPM and EDO RAM together, for example two 72pin SODIMM RAM modules consiting of 2x16MB EDO are valid however the same is not true for two 72pin SODIMM RAM modules consiting of 1x 16MB EDO and 1x 16MB FPM. The latter only applies to older laptops which use FPM or EDO RAM. Newer "older" laptops use SDRAM or DDR memory which cannot be mixed as it is only available in 144pin and 200pin SODIMM RAM modules respectively.


  • 2b) Single-channel laptops that use SODIMM RAM modules (my laptop has no unoccupied memory slots)
  • If your Pentium or newer class laptop supporting FPM, EDO, SDRAM or DDR RAM in the form of a SODIMM RAM module does not have any unoccupied memory slots then there is no choice but to first remove at least one FPM, EDO, SDRAM, DDR 72, 144, 200pin SODIMM RAM module from a corresponding memory slot. Providing that the currently installed combined total of memory is below the maximum supported capacity by your laptop then either one or both (in the case of laptops that feature a total of two memory slots) of the currently installed laptop computer memory modules can be exchanged for a larger capacity FPM, EDO, SDRAM or DDR 72, 144, 200pin RAM module. To achieve this, purchase a likewise higher capacity FPM, EDO, SDRAM or DDR 72, 144, 200pin SODIMM RAM module to occupy the one or two memory slots. Keep in mind that if you wish to upgrade such older laptop to the maximum amount of supported RAM then you must install the highest capacity of 72, 144, 200pin SODIMM RAM module your laptop supports, one in each memory slot.


    Valid laptop memory upgrades (examples) are the same as in (2a) above.



Single-channel DDR2, DDR2 and DDR3 laptops

Select smaller types of modern laptops (sub-notebooks or netbooks etc.) very often support a modern memory technology such as DDR2 or DDR3 however do not support dual channel operation. In these cases, follow the upgrade path depicted in (2a) and (2b) above (whichever relates to your situation). Also note that such systems often also feature only one memory slot due to space contraints. For this reason apply the above logic accordingly, namely where you would normally buy up to two new laptop RAM modules purchase only one.



Upgrading a dual channel laptop - applies to some DDR and virtually all newer DDR2, DDR3 laptops

All newer laptops starting with some that use DDR RAM and virtually all that use DDR2 or DDR3 RAM support dual channel operation. The only exceptions are certain sub-notebooks and netbooks as we mentioned above - these unfortunately only support single channel operation. All dual channel compliant laptops allow you to install two indentical laptop RAM modules to enhance memory throughput. Do note that this is optional yet recommended because it boosts memory performance. If you install two laptop RAM modules that are of the same type and capacity but of varying memory speed and memory timing then the slower of the two RAM modules will take authority and hence the laptop's BIOS will use its memory speed and memory timings for both. For this reason, always try and install identical RAM modules should you want to enable an optimum dual channel configuration. Follow the below practises when upgrading your dual channel laptop.



  • 3a) Dual-channel laptops that use SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM modules (my laptop has unoccupied memory slots)
  • If your laptop supporting DDR, DDR2 or DDR3 RAM in the form of a SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM module has some unoccupied memory slots (for example out of a total of four, two are vacant) then all you really need to do is purchase two likewise identical DDR, DDR2 or DDR3 200 or 204pin SODIMM or 172 or 214pin MicroDIMM RAM modules (whichever is suited to your laptop model) to occupy the unoccupied memory slots. The only exception to this statement is if you wish to upgrade such newer laptop to the maximum amount of laptop RAM it supports. In such case you would need to install the highest capacity of 200, 204, 172, 214pin SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM module your laptop supports, one in each memory slot. Consequently, this may involve removing the existing 200, 204, 172, 214pin SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM modules.


    Valid laptop memory upgrades (examples) are 2x512MB DDR 200pin SODIMM, 2x1GB DDR2 200pin SODIMM, 2x2GB DDR3 204pin SODIMM etc. The maximum capacity of laptop RAM module will vary depending on your model of laptop (specifically its memory controller).


  • 3b) Dual-channel laptops that use SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM modules (my laptop has no unoccupied memory slots)
  • If your laptop supporting DDR, DDR2 or DDR3 RAM in the form of a SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM module does not have any unoccupied memory slots then there is no choice but to first remove at least one pair of 200, 204, 172, 214pin SODIMM or MicroDIMM DDR, DDR2 or DDR3 RAM modules from the corresponding memory slots. While it is possible to remove only one such laptop RAM module, this will prevent your laptop performing in dual channel mode once you replace the vacant memory slot with a new RAM module of a different (higher) capacity. Providing that the currently installed combined total of memory is below the maximum supported capacity by your laptop then either one or both of the currently installed RAM modules can be exchanged for larger capacity 200, 204, 172, 214pin DDR, DDR2, DDR3 RAM modules. To achieve this, purchase at least a pair (recommended to ensure proper dual channel operation) of likewise higher capacity DDR, DDR2 or DDR3 200, 204, 172, 214pin SODIMM or MicroDIMM RAM modules to occupy at least two memory slots. Keep in mind that if you wish to upgrade such newer laptop to the maximum amount of supported memory then you must install the highest capacity of 200, 204, 172, 214pin SODIMM or MicroDIMM (whichever is suited to your laptop model) RAM module your laptop supports, one in each memory slot.


    Valid laptop memory upgrades (examples) are the same as in 3a above.


The relation between laptop memory modules and memory slots

Memory slots - laptops Vs desktops

Laptops in contrast to select desktops do not support more than one type of RAM module. The reason for this is that laptops are much more compact and thus due to space contraints only ever support one type of memory slot that houses such module. In practise this means the following:


  • A) Laptops do not feature both SIMM, SODIMM or MicroDIMM memory slots
  • B) Laptops do not feature more than one version of memory slot of the same type (for example a 72pin and 144pin SODIMM memory slot)

Consequently, remember that for example a 72pin SODIMM laptop RAM module will not fit into a 144pin SODIMM memory slot and vice versa. The same goes for a 144pin and 200pin SODIMM and accompanying memory slot - and as before, vice versa. While they may look similar to the untrained eye, they are in fact quite the opposite. The good news is that each type of laptop RAM module and therefore memory slot has its own notch placement that prevents incorrect insertion. The rule of thumb to remember is that a 72pin SODIMM goes into a 72pin SODIMM memory slot, a 144pin SODIMM into a 144pin SODIMM memory slot, a 200pin SODIMM into a 200pin SODIMM memory slot and so forth - hopefully you get the logic. This simple rule of thumb should help you when ordering laptop RAM modules.



Laptops and the number of memory slots - how it influences your upgrade

Most laptops often feature two, three or at most four memory slots suited to the type of supported laptop RAM. By example this means a laptop will usually feature two 200pin SODIMM DDR2 memory slots if it's a newer laptop or two to four 72pin SIMM FPM or EDO memory slots if it's a vastly older laptop. Of course, there are some exceptions - modern workstations class laptops may also feature up to four memory slots. Because in the vast majority of cases your laptop already has some memory installed, at least one or two of these memory slots will be occupied by a compatible laptop RAM module. In some cases all the memory slots will be occupied. The good news is you can upgrade in both these cases, only differently. How you upgrade will depend on whether your laptop features SIMM, SODIMM or MicroDIMM memory slots as well as whether it supports single or dual channel operation.



Laptops with some RAM soldered onto the motherboard

Some laptops models from various manufacturers (sadly there isn't a one theory suits all to share with you) sometimes feature part of their memory already soldered onto the their motherboard. In such case this RAM cannot be removed. The good news is that many of these laptops still allow upgrading the amount of RAM via a number of SIMM, SODIMM or MicroDIMM memory slots, usually up to a total of two or four - the older the laptop, the more memory slots it will generally contain. Upgrading a laptop that follows this rule is no different than upgrading any other single or dual channel laptop.


Dual channel - making the most out of memory performance

Single and Dual Channel operation

Ever since DDR RAM based laptops, some including virtually all newer DDR2 and DDR3 RAM based laptops support dual channel operation. If you've been following us right through this guide you'll already know we mentioned this term quite a few times. Is it finally echoing in your ears? If so great because it's actually quite important - let us explain. What dual channel means in practise is that two identical RAM modules work in tandem to theoritically double the amount of memory throughput (bandwidth) made available to the processor. The end result is faster overall system performance. There is often confusion because some retailers and/or e-tailers use the term "dual channel" to differentiate memory that is capable (or not) of operating in dual channel mode. The truth of the matter is that there is no such distinciton between the two, DDR, DDR2 and DDR3 RAM that isn't capable of operating in dual channel mode simply doesn't exist. All DDR, DDR2 and DDR3 laptop RAM can run in dual channel mode providing the given laptop (specifically its memory controller) supports it.


Because dual channel is supported by a wide range of DDR, DDR2 and DDR3 RAM based laptops it makes perfect sense to make use of it to boost system performance even further.



Dual channel and non-identical RAM modules

Some laptop manufacturers ship laptops containing non-identical capacity 200, 204, 214pin SODIMM or MicroDIMM DDR2 or DDR3 laptop RAM modules (for example 1x 2GB and 1x 1GB for 3GB in total) which void the general rule of thumb for enabling dual channel operation in laptops that support it. As a general reminder, for dual channel operation in laptops that support it, a laptop must contain two identical laptop RAM modules in two memory slots. If a compliant laptop contains more than two slots (for example four slots - rare but possible in workstation class high-end laptops) then another pair of identical laptop RAM modules can be inserted to expand the total amount of installed memory and also satisfy the requirements for dual channel operation. Let's take a loook at this issue in more detail below.


Newer DDR2 and DDR3 RAM based laptops allow mixing non-identical capacity RAM modules though this is still not recommended. The memory controller in these laptops supports the installation of likewise laptop RAM modules of varying capacity for what may be referred to as semi dual channel operation. From a technical perspective, the RAM in such laptops operates in dual channel mode up to the common level of capacity of each RAM module for each pair. For example, if a laptop manufacturer has provided 1x 2GB in memory slot 0 and 1x 1GB in memory slot 1 of DDR2 RAM modules for a combined total of 3GB, only 2GB of this amount will run in dual channel mode while the remaining 1GB will be forced to operate in single channel mode. Consequently, if you own such a laptop then its memory throughput (thus performance) would benefit if it used two identical laptop RAM modules of the same capacity. Alternatively you would need to make sure to only ever use up to 2GB out of the 3GB of RAM in your laptop - going beyond this limit would result in a performance hit. In order to fully satisfy the requirements of enabling dual channel mode in compliant laptops replacing, as in the example above, 1x 2GB and 1x 1GB = 3GB with 2x 2GB = 4GB total would not only offer you more memory in total, but also the enhanced performance (throughput) of dual channel mode for the entire 4GB of installed RAM.


Older DDR and some DDR2 RAM based laptops do not support the above semi dual mode option and thus strictly require two identical laptop RAM modules in two memory slots if they are to successfully run in dual channel mode. Failure to comply with this will either cause your laptop to not boot up, run erractically, or simply run in a forced single channel mode. Regardless whether you wish to upgrade an older DDR or newer DDR2 or DDR3 dual channel laptop, it's highly recommended to not mix and match different capacity modules and instead stick to upgrading in matched pairs.


Go back and read about the Types of laptop memory...

...or continue reading to learn about How much laptop memory is optimum and how to upgrade sensibly.

PC3-8500 1066MHz DDR3 204-pin SODIMM's

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